He was under forty, but he had a daughter already twelve years old, and two sons at school. He had been married young, when he was a student in his second year, and by now his wife seemed half as old again as he.  She was a tall, erect woman with dark eyebrows, staid and dignified, and, as she said herself, intellectual. She read a great deal, used phonetic spelling, called her husband, not Dmitri, but Dimitri, and he secretly considered her unintelligent, narrow, inelegant, was afraid of her, and did not like to be at home. He had begun being unfaitful to her long ago — and had been unfaithful to her often, and, probably on that account, almost always spoke ill of women, and when they were talked about in his presence used to call them the ‘lower race’.

The Lady with the Little Dog, Anton Chekhov

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